Working Out the Same Muscles Two Days in a Row

In a recent Men’s Health magazine e-mail, they were pimping a book called “Huge in a Hurry” by Chad Waterbury. In this book the author expounds upon the virtues of working the same muscle groups multiple days in a row. 
Because I focus a lot on the energy system and performance aspect I am improving when I train, this concept made perfect sense to me. Let’s go over the basic idea here.
First, working the same muscle group two days in a row does not mean taking the same bodybuilding workout routine you did for your back and repeating it the next day. That is a sure way to overtraining. 
Instead, consider the gymnast. One day’s workout may consist of a typical warm-up, then technique work on the rings. If one day is heavy on the rings, the next day may be split between strength work (in the gym) and a review of the previous day’s techniques. 
The same muscle groups are being used, but the ring’s training load has decreased, and a different modality is used in the gym. The next may be spent doing recovery exercises. An example would be lighter resistance and stretching; nothing too heavy or difficult. 
Functional workouts, such as those used in Crossfit gyms or at GymJones, focus on a particular energy system. The workouts are designed to improve strength, power, endurance or build muscle; but usually a combination of these. This approach means the same muscle groups will often be trained several days in a row, or at least with less than 48 hours recovery time.

For example, an Absolute Strength day may look like this:
Warm-up: 10 minutes on stationary bike or rower.
Dynamic-specific warm-up for:
-Deadlift: 1-2 sets at 40-50 percent of 1 repetition max x 10-20. Not to failure.
Then:
-Deadlift: 5-6 sets; work up to singles or doubles at 90% of 1 rep. max.

A Strength Endurance day:
Same warm up and dynamic warm up (only one set this time.)
-Deadlift: 5 x 12, 6,5,3,12, working up to 80-85 percent 1 RM.
Between deadlift sets do:
Stationary bike or rower x 1 minute at hard pace.
After deadlift/sprint rest 90 seconds and repeat.
Finish with 20 minutes at steady pace on rower or bike.

A Power workout using the back squat could look like this:
General warm up
Dynamic warm up with bodyweight squats or light weight.
Then:
Back Squat: 8 x 3 reps. Use a fast but controlled eccentric movement (going down,) and accelerate the bar as fast as possible when standing up. The power reps are not to failure, and are done with 40-50 percent of your one rep. max.
Although you may not want to train any single performance aspet two days in a row, these workouts could be done as strength, endurance and power three days in a row. Or as strength, power and strength/endurance. Other combinations training sport specific activities are also possible.
There are training systems that subject the trainees to heavy workloads on a daily basis, such as the Bulgarian method. Bulgarian Olympic lifters have been known to work on maximum and near maximum lifts six days a week, often enduring more than one workout per day. 
If weightlifting is not your full-time job, though, stick to varying your workload and your intensity. The results will be magnificent, and you just might make faster gains than you ever have before.
***Get the advice of a professional trainer or coach (which I am not) before attempting new and different exercise programs!
Listen to Louie Simmons teaching about increasing bench pressing power. This man has a wealth of knowledge.
Get Chad Waterbury’s book “Huge in a Hurry” here:

                                           

For more information about lifting with bands, go here:

http://www.flexandflow.com

Read more about muscle-building workouts here:

http://www.realmusclefast.com

Best Home Gymnastics Ring Workout for Building Pectoral Muscles

How to Build Strong Back Muscles

Big Strong Arms Workout Routines

Muscle Mass-The Best Basic Lifts for Maximum Gains

Is it a Rope Trainer, a Suspension Trainer or a USA? None of the Above

I want to share today’s workout routine with you, because it was a little weird and kind of fun, and still gave me a great back workout and more. You might even want to try this, but real quick, some back story.

Since I made my first suspension trainer out of rope,
(you can read about it here: http://mosladder.hubpages.com/hub/Adventures-with-Suspension-Training-in-My-Garage-Gym)  I have had something of an obsession with the stuff. The rope that is.

The tire swing/climbing rope

I made a jumprope suspension trainer, pull-up handles with pvc and rope, I even made a tire swing/climbing rope with yellow 1 inch polyester rope.  Braiding the rope became a therapeutic pastime.  Take a 100′ foot length of rope, cut it into three or four equal lengths and braid it together.

It would be used for something, I just wasn’t sure what.

Then I saw the Universal Strength Apparatus (About the USA)
which could be called ‘suspended ladder training,’ since that is what it is. Two narrow ladders with multiple rungs. The rungs/handles are stiff, the rest is not. The nice part is there is no adjustment necessary, and you can do crazy things like ‘jumping dips’ to the next rung.

Bingo! Why not tie some handles into my braided ropes and use them like the universal strength apparatus? Using two braided ropes with loop handles tied in every few inches, I could hang them side by side and get a ‘suspended ladder training’ style workout.

Before the second one was done I tried it with one. I used the yellow and black hanging in the picture below by throwing it over my pull-up bar.

Hmmm, it was a little awkward, but good for pushups, flyes, body rows and the like. Still not a USA, though.

With a second braided rope of equal size, I tried again:
This wasn’t working. Does the contraption above look strange and uncomfortable? Yeah, it was, in a bad way. So I thought about it some more. In the meantime, the thicker blue rope (with only two handles) made the perfect suspension trainer, and was comfortable enough to get a full workout on. Adjusting by looping the ends around the pull-up bar is easy.

                                           Still, what to do with all this yellow and black rope?

Ahaaaa!! Rowing! 

Functional exercises are great, and in this case, you can target your back muscles as well. Which brings me to today’s workout, which consisted of standing in place pulling the weighted rope towards me in a hand over hand motion. Let me just say this beats the hell out of rowing a barbell or dumbbells, and IMHO, is better than sitting in front of a machine with cables.
In the pics above, you will notice a green rope and some pvc pipe. The original plan was to loop the braided rope end through the plates and tie a large knot to pull against the plates. But I found this pipe and rope sitting around, and that was that. The only tying involved was green rope to braided rope. Done.

One plate was good for getting a rhthym, but far too light for a decent workout. So I threw another 45# on. Much better. I probably knocked out 10 back and forth laps before doing a few pull-ups and curls and calling it a day. My lats were definitely worked and my arms as well. There were other advantages to this fun outdoor workout too.

1.) Core involvement. The hand-over-hand motion requires core rotation plus hip and glute stabilization; and who doesn’t want a tighter core and gluteus?

2.) Progressive Resistance: Because I was dragging these plates through the gravel, the closer it got, the harder it became. Also, the more weight you add, the greater the drag because it picks up even more gravel. This works well in sand, too.

This exercise/workout will be part of my permanent rotation from now on. There are a myriad of ways to use this. Put the handles in front and push, or hang them from your shoulders and pull like a sled dog. Either way, this satisfies my need for unusual, interesting and effective workout equipment!

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To see the Universal Strength Apparatus for yourself:

Universal Strength Apparatus

For more great workout ideas:

Traveling Workout and Portable Gym and Exercise Equipment

Gymnastic Ring Workout Routines at Home

Every Pushup Exercise you can Think of and the Celebrities Who do them

How to Build Strong Back Muscles

A complete muscle-building program for free:

The Fast Muscle Program

Special Ops Elite Fitness Training for Everyday People

Special Ops Elite Fitness Training for Everyday People

For an interesting look into the day-to-day training of special ops in the U.S. Military, click on the link above. With an emphasis on mission readiness, these workouts are designed to get elite soldiers ready for combat and intense training exercises, imagine what it can do for the everyday athlete!

Exercise Equipment for doing Pushups? Really?

I am not one to use tools where bare hands or a little sweat equity will do the job. I believe in performing simple tasks through your own power, especially when it comes to exercise. This is why you’d catch me skating a frozen lake in hell before working out in a commercial gym or using a machine. 
There are times when the right tool just does a better job, though. Allows you to expand your workout horizons both mentally and physically. Or maybe your wrists just hurt. In any case, this is why I built my own paralletes; so I could expand my horizons, that is. 
The first pair sucked. When I used this colloquial term, ‘sucked,’ what I actually mean is they creaked and groaned, were too tall to be true paralletes and too short to be true dipping bars. They worked great for things like flat and decline pushups with your feet on a ladder, though, so I kept them. 
Then came the Perfect Pushup. I know you have heard of it, but stay with me a second. You know what’s really great about these things? They twist. Simple right? That, and they put your wrists in a favorable joint position, easing the strain there and forcing your pectoral muscles and triceps to take over.


I laughed when my friend picked these up. “Dude, seriously? They’re frickin’ pushups, just do them on the ground.”
“I know, I know, but just try knocking out twenty of those with the wrist twisting action. It’s harder to do, man.”
And you know what? It was.
I thought about making another, shorter pair of paralletes after that, but I couldn’t get those efficient Perfect Pushups out of my mind. Backtracking to my neanderthal contraptions seemed blatantly ignorant. 

Not that I threw them away! I’m not about to invert my feet five or six feet above my head on the Perfect Pushups. But a few bucks for an extra piece of equipment to keep me motivated? Why not.

You can still find the perfect pushup bars for about $20 bucks at the website below. Or pick up the latest V2 Perfect Pushup handles. What’s the difference? It is a smoother, more stable version of the original, and has a somewhat different (streamlined?) appearance. Pretty cool if you don’t mind paying twice the money. 


If the idea of twisting while you do pushups is a turn-off, basic low paralletes are an excellent addition to your workout room. Check it out:

Prefer to make your own? Here are some great tutorials: